Adpost Pets Code of Practice

It is in the best interest of Adpost Pets to cultivate a safe and healthy community of responsible pet and animal lovers. However, readily available access to the Internet also makes it easier for illegitimate breeders, irresponsible owners, and scammers to take advantage of the platform and transact with others with the least regard for the animal's welfare.

To protect yourself and others, Adpost Pets strongly encourages users to be careful in viewing advertisements and conduct a thorough investigation.

When looking for a pet online to adopt or posting an advertisement for your animal, it is important to meet the person and especially important to meet the pet before agreeing to anything. Never adopt a pet from someone who is unwilling to let you see how and where the animal is living.

*Under the Animals and Birds (Pet Shop and Exhibition) Rules 2004, no person shall use any premises as a pet shop, or for any exhibition or distribution of animals or birds, except in accordance with a valid license issued by the Director-General under rule 4 and in accordance with the conditions, if any, of that license.

When searching for a pet on Adpost Pets, either thru responding to posted ads or by posting your own wanting to adopt/buy ad on the site, please refer to these tips and guidelines:

  1. Visit the place where the animal is kept and see how it was raised and cared for. If the pet owner is unwilling to let you have a look at the animal, please re-consider adopting the animal. Also, ask for as much information as possible about the animal's history in terms of source, health records, and behaviour information.
  2. If possible, get references, such as the animal's veterinarian. Check them out and be vigilant to ensure that the pet is in good health.
  3. Get all health guarantees and other promises in writing.

When advertising your pet on Adpost Pets, read through these tips and guidelines:

  • Advertise through friends, neighbours, and local veterinarians first; then try Adpost Pets. Your chances of finding a good home are increased when you check references with someone you know.
  • Visit the prospective new home in order to get a feel for the environment in which, your pet will be living. Explain that the pet is part of your family and that you want to make sure he or she will be cared for. Screen potential homes carefully.
  • Be vigilant. If anyone refuses to allow you to visit their home, do not place your pet with them. Individuals known as "bunchers" routinely answer "free-to-good-home" ads, posing as people who want family pets when, in actual fact, they sell pets to animal dealers. Always be mindful of your own safety when you go to interview potential adopters or if you allow a prospective adopter to enter your home.
  • Carefully consider all the elements of the new home: Will your pet get along with small children? Is the family planning to keep the dog chained outside as a watch dog? Will the cat be kept only as a mouse catcher? Does the family have a veterinary reference? Do not be shy about asking questions. Your pet's life and happiness may depend on it.
  • Ask for a valid form of identification (NRIC/ driver's licence). Record the number for your keeping and require the new owner to sign a contract stating the requirements of adoption upon which both parties agree. As part of the contract, require the new owner to contact you if he or she decides at some point that they must give up the pet.
  • Have your pet before he or she goes to the new home. This will make the animal more adoptable and help stop irresponsible breeding.
  • If your pet is chronically ill or has behavioural problems, it may be difficult to find him a suitable home. A new owner may not be willing or able to deal with these issues, and it may also be difficult for the pet to adjust to a new home. The decision to humanely euthanize such a pet should not be made without thoughtful input from a veterinarian, a behaviourist, and the family, based on how well they believe their companion would adapt to a new home.

Preparations for a new arrival

Pets undergo stress when moving to a new home. Be patient and provide lots of affection. You may refer to some points below to help your new arrival settle in safely:

Cats - For the first few days in your new home, it's best to confine your cat to one room, while you work on putting the rest of the place in order. Prepare the room with your cat's bed, litter box, food and water bowls, and toys.

Now is the perfect time to make your cat an indoor-only pet. Indoor-only cats live longer and healthier lives. Resist attempts by your cat to go outdoors. If your cat hasn't established an outdoor territory, he or she is less likely to be interested in going outside. High-rise living presents dangers to the curious and agile cat. Therefore, you should secure your windows with mesh. You may also wish to mesh the front gate as well to prevent your cat from wandering out of your home. If you play with your cat and supply lots of attention, your cat should have all he or she needs indoors.

Cat Care Essentials

Although cats appear independent, they still rely on their human counterparts to provide them with necessities for survival such as healthy food, clean water, safe shelter, regular veterinary care, exercise, and more. Here are several essentials regarding dog care that you may want to follow for the betterment of your feline friend:

  1. Outfit your cat with a collar and ID tag that includes your name, address, and telephone number. It is inevitable for your feline friend to get lost regardless of the owner's care Providing an ID tag on their collar increases the chances of your pets returning home safely should the unexpected happen. It's good practice to microchip your cat and register it with PetCall.
  2. Keep your cat indoors. Keeping your cat safely confined at all times is best for you, your pet, and your community.
  3. Take your cat to the veterinarian or veterinary hospital for regular check-ups. You may ask your local animal shelter or a pet owning friend for a referral should you have no veterinarian.
  4. Sterilise your pet. Cats show lesser behavioral problems, gain better health, and reduce tendency to wander when sterilized. It also helps reduce the problem of cat overpopulation.
  5. Give your cat a healthy and nutritionally balanced diet, including access to fresh water. Consult with your veterinarian when it comes to which foods to feed your pet and how often their feeding schedule should be.
  6. Train your feline friend from undesirable behaviors such as jumping on countertops and scratching furniture. Despite how difficult it seems, cats can be trained with a bit of patience, effort, and understanding.
  7. Groom your cat often to maintain their coat healthy, soft, and shiny. Although cats have a habit of constantly grooming themselves, their owners should brush and remove loose hair to prevent it from matting. When cats groom themselves, they ingest a great deal of hair, which leads to hairballs.
  8. Find time to play with your cat. While cats do not exhibit the same level of exercise and excitement as dogs to, they enjoy regular play sessions that also serve as physical exercise and mental stimulation. It's also a good opportunity to develop and strengthen you and your pet's bond.

Dogs - Ideally, your dog's introduction to his new home will be with familiar furniture already in place, including his bed and crate, toys, and food and water bowls. If you must be away from home for many hours each day, look into a pet-sitter or consider dog day care.

  • Safety- Make your new home safe for all pets by being mindful of, or providing a secure place for, hazards that can...
    • poison - such as cleansers, insect sprays and pesticides, medications, chocolate, certain plants, and antifreeze (ethylene glycol)
    • burn - such as plugged-in appliances, boiling liquids, open flames
    • electrocute - such as worn lamp cords
    • strangle, choke, or obstruct breathing - such as choke collars, small balls, sewing thread and needles, pantyhose, and bones
    • topple or crush - such as precariously placed appliances, top-heavy filing cabinets, and lamps
    • allow escape or theft - such as loose screens and inadequate fences. Never leave your pet unattended on a balcony or chained in a yard.
  • Veterinary Care

As soon as possible, choose a veterinarian and veterinary hospital. It is advisable to get your pet checked by a vet right upon adoption to ensure that it is in good health.

  • Dog Care Essentials

s provide a lifetime of unconditional love, loyalty, friendship. They count on their human partners to provide them with necessities for survival such as healthy food, clean water, safe shelter, regular veterinary care, exercise, and more. Here are several essentials regarding dog care that you may want to follow:

*Licencees of dogs specified in the Second Schedule of the Animals and Birds (Dog Licensing and Control) Rules are required to comply with Animals and Birds (Dog Licensing and Control) Rules 8 & 9. These include, but are not limited to microchipping, sterilization for dogs over 6 months of age, insurance approved by the Director-General, banker's guarantee, and dogs to be leashed and securely fitted with a muzzle whenever off property. These breeds of dogs (specified in the Second Schedule of said Rules) are listed as:

  • Pit Bull, which includes the American Pit Bull Terrier (which is also known as the American Pit Bull and Pit Bull Terrier), American Staffordshire Terrier, Staffordshire Bull Terrier, American Bulldog, and crosses between them and other breeds
  • Akita
  • Neapolitan Mastiff
  • Tosa
  • Dogo Argentino
  • Fila Brasileiro
  • Boerboel
  • Perro De Presa Canario
  • Bull Terrier
  • Doberman Pinscher
  • Rottweiler
  • German Shepherd Dog with its related breeds such as the Belgian Shepherd Dog and the East European Shepherd Dog
  • Mastiffs, including the Bull Mastiff, Cane Corso and Dogue De Bordeaux
  • Crosses of above breeds
  1. Licence your dog and vaccinate him for rabies. Check with the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority (AVS), regarding legal requirements, microchipping and licensing of dog and where to have your pet vaccinated. You can get more information on dog licensing at the AVS website https://www.nparks.gov.sg/avs.
  2. Microchip and outfit your dog with a collar and ID tag that includes your name, address, and telephone number. It is inevitable for your loyal companion to get lost regardless of the care of the owner. Providing an ID tag on their collar increases the chances of your pets returning home safely should the unexpected happen. You can get your dog microchipped at any vet clinic. The microchip number would be tagged to the dog licence which would trace back to the owner's details.
  3. Follow this simple rule - off property, on leash. Under the Animals and Birds Act, all dogs are to be securely leashed and under control of the handler at all times in a public place. Breed of dogs specified in the Second Schedule of the Animals & Birds (Dog Licensing and Control) Rules must be securely fitted with a muzzle in a public place to prevent the dog from biting a person. These breeds are also listed as No. 1 to 15 in the Adpost Pets Pets of Code of Practice.
  4. Provide proper shelter for your pets. Dogs should never be left outside alone for extended periods of time. A fenced yard with a doghouse is a bonus, especially for large and active dogs.
  5. Take your dog to the veterinarian or veterinary hospital for regular check-ups. You may ask your local animal shelter or a pet owning friend for a referral should you have no veterinarian.
  6. Sterilise your dog. Dogs tend to live longer, become healthier, and exhibit fewer behavioural problems (e.g., biting, running away) when they undergo routine surgery for sterilising. They have lesser urges to wander and doing so helps reduce the problem of pet overpopulation.
  7. Give your dog a healthy and nutritionally balanced diet, including access to fresh water. Consult with your veterinarian when it comes to which foods to feed your pet and how often their feeding schedule should be.
  8. Enroll your dog in a training class. Dog behaviours greatly improve with positive training classes. It is also a good opportunity to bond better with your companion.
  9. Ensure that your dog gets enough exercise to keep him physically fit. Walking your dog twice a day serves as sufficient exercise to keep your companion healthy. Not only is this beneficial for your dog, regular exercise also benefits the owner. Ask your veterinarian for the appropriate amount of physical activities suitable for your dog.



 


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